Romans 8:39

No power in the sky above or in the earth below–indeed, nothing in all creation will ever be able to separate us from the love of God that is revealed in Christ Jesus our Lord. (Romans 8:39, NLT)

God created everything.  God is the only non-created being anywhere.  So if God wants to love us, what can stop Him?

Our sinful nature could have stopped Him.  God is good, and He will not have fellowship with evil, nor can evil have fellowship with God.  But when Jesus came to earth, He took our sin nature upon Himself, and died to it!

So if God wants to love us, what can stop Him?

Romans 8:1 set up the one condition every promise is this letter is hinged upon:

So now there is no condemnation for those who belong to Christ Jesus.

The opposite of this statement is the gravest truth a human can face:

There is condemnation for those who do not belong to Christ Jesus.

God will not love us if we do not accept the sacrifice of His Son.  We will have to answer for our own mistakes.

But if we belong to Christ Jesus, nothing anywhere ever can stop His love for us.  And He proved it on the cross.

No power in the sky above or in the earth below–indeed, nothing in all creation will ever be able to separate us from the love of God that is revealed in Christ Jesus our Lord. (Romans 8:39, NLT)

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Published in: on June 10, 2011 at 8:25 pm  Leave a Comment  
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Romans 8:38

And I am convinced that nothing can ever separate us from God’s love. Neither death nor life, neither angels nor demons, neither our fears for today nor our worries about tomorrow–not even the powers of hell can separate us from God’s love. (Romans 8:38, NLT)

Paul, the writer of Romans, could have abbreviated this verse (really, part of his letter, as there were no “verses” when he wrote) by stopping after, “And I am convinced that nothing can ever separate us from God’s love.”  This strong statement can stand alone.

However, Paul knows human nature.  He knows people like me will wonder, Does Paul mean “nothing nothing” or just some nothings?  Which nothings does Paul mean?  Which nothings are excluded from the offer?

So Paul begins a mind boggling list of what can never separate followers of Jesus Christ from God’s love:

  • Death: Can my soul leaving my body separate me from Jesus?  No!  Jesus will call me to be with Him!
  • Life: Can the slavery of sin separate me from Jesus?  No!  He has bought me back!
  • Angels: Can these powerful, righteous warriors separate me from Jesus?  No!  They obey Jesus, and Jesus loves me!
  • Demons: Can these powerful, wicked warriors separate me from Jesus?  No!  They obey the commands of Jesus, because they have no power to do otherwise!
  • Fears for today: Can my problems, my sins, or my responsibilities separate me from Jesus?  No!   Jesus makes a straight path for me even when my choices and my circumstances place me in a labyrinth of dead ends.
  • Worries about tomorrow: Can my anxieties, my supposed “predictions”, and my what-ifs separate me from Jesus?  No!  Jesus knows the future and He is the Master Warrior.  There is nothing that stands in between Him and me—including my sin—that He cannot destroy.
  • Powers of Hell: Can Hell separate me from Jesus?  No!  Jesus holds the keys to Hell, and He will never lock me away, because He is the One who got me out!

Can “nothing” really mean “nothing”?

Paul isn’t through.

We haven’t even gotten to verse 39!

And I am convinced that nothing can ever separate us from God’s love. Neither death nor life, neither angels nor demons, neither our fears for today nor our worries about tomorrow–not even the powers of hell can separate us from God’s love. (Romans 8:38, NLT)

Romans 8:37

No, despite all these things, overwhelming victory is ours through Christ, who loved us. (Romans 8:37, NLT)

In context:

Can anything ever separate us from Christ’s love? Does it mean He no longer loves us if we have trouble or calamity, or are persecuted, or hungry, or destitute, or in danger, or threatened with death?  (As the Scriptures say, “For your sake we are killed every day; we are being slaughtered like sheep.”)  No, despite all these things, overwhelming victory is ours through Christ, who loved us. (Romans 8:35-37, NLT, 37 underlined)

The verb is in past tense here: loved, not only in this version, but in the ESV, NASB, KJV, NIV, and others as well.

Why loved and not loves?

In the context, we know Paul is not saying that Jesus once loved His people but doesn’t now, because verse 35 asks “Can anything ever separate us from Christ’s love?” with a resounding answer of no in verse 37.  Again, in verse 35 Paul asks, “Does it mean He no longer loves us if . . .” with the same powerful no in verse 37.

So why does Paul choose to say “Christ, who loved us” is verse 37?

Let’s remember that he has been talking to early Christians, many of whom are going through really bad times.  Paul has just referenced Psalm 44 in verse 36 of Romans, saying:

(As the Scriptures say, “For your sake we are killed every day; we are being slaughtered like sheep.”)

For God’s sake the early church, like the psalmists writing Psalm 44, were suffering.  But what should anyone who loves God remember when they are enduring trouble and sorrow?

Jesus suffered first.  Before even the foundations of the earth were made, Jesus experienced the unimaginable burden and agony of taking on the sins of the world.  Before ever He was born as a human child, before He had even created human beings, He knew the price His love was willing to pay.

Jesus loved.

A love so strong that not even the worst possible suffering could separate Him from it.

If His own suffering could not separate Him from His love for us . . . how could our suffering?  (It is truly humbling to even think He should care about our sufferings, when He has gone through so much already!  And how much of the suffering in my own life can I even attribute as resulting from my love for Him?  I have gone through nothing for Him.  He has gone through everything for me!)

A love so strong that not even His own death could separate Him from it.

If His own death could not separate Him from His love for us . . . how could our deaths?

No, despite all these things, overwhelming victory is ours through Christ, who loved us. (Romans 8:37, NLT)

Romans 8:36

(As the Scriptures say, “For your sake we are killed every day; we are being slaughtered like sheep.”) (Romans 8:36, NLT)

In context:

Can anything ever separate us from Christ’s love? Does it mean He no longer loves us if we have trouble or calamity, or are persecuted, or hungry, or destitute, or in danger, or threatened with death?  (As the Scriptures say, “For your sake we are killed every day; we are being slaughtered like sheep.”) (Romans 8:35-36, NLT, 36 underlined)

Since we read “as the Scriptures say”, let’s go back to the original reference.  Romans 8:36 refers to Psalm 44:22:

But for your sake we are killed every day; we are being slaughtered like sheep. (NLT)

If I wanted to figure out the meaning of a sentence in an email, what would I do? Probably read the rest of the email!  In such a way, let’s look at all of Psalm 44 for clues to God’s message in Romans 8:36

O God, we have heard it with our own ears—

our ancestors have told us

of all you did in their day,

in days long ago:

You drove out the pagan nations by your power

and gave all the land to our ancestors.

You crushed their enemies

and set our ancestors free.

They did not conquer the land with their swords;

it was not their own strong arm that gave them victory.

It was your right hand and strong arm

and the blinding light from your face that helped them,

for you loved them.

You are my King and my God.

You command victories for Israel.

Only by your power can we push back our enemies;

only in your name can we trample our foes.

I do not trust in my bow;

I do not count on my sword to save me.

You are the one who gives us victory over our enemies;

you disgrace those who hate us.

O God, we give glory to you all day long

and constantly praise your name.

Interlude

But now you have tossed us aside in dishonor.

You no longer lead our armies to battle.

You make us retreat from our enemies

and allow those who hate us to plunder our land.

You have butchered us like sheep

and scattered us among the nations.

You sold your precious people for a pittance,

making nothing on the sale.

You let our neighbors mock us.

We are an object of scorn and derision to those around us.

You have made us the butt of their jokes;

they shake their heads at us in scorn.

We can’t escape the constant humiliation;

shame is written across our faces.

All we hear are the taunts of our mockers.

All we see are our vengeful enemies.

All this has happened though we have not forgotten you.

We have not violated your covenant.

Our hearts have not deserted you.

We have not strayed from your path.

Yet you have crushed us in the jackal’s desert home.

You have covered us with darkness and death.

If we had forgotten the name of our God

or spread our hands in prayer to foreign gods,

God would surely have known it,

for he knows the secrets of every heart.

But for your sake we are killed every day;

we are being slaughtered like sheep.

Wake up, O Lord! Why do you sleep?

Get up! Do not reject us forever.

Why do you look the other way?

Why do you ignore our suffering and oppression?

We collapse in the dust,

lying face down in the dirt.

Rise up! Help us!

Ransom us because of your unfailing love (NLT)

To me, this is not an easy Scripture to understand.  It’s very tempting when we come to Scriptures that seem more difficult to us or more complex to either ignore them or read superficially over them.  But this Psalm was so important to Paul that he quoted from it in his letter to the Romans.

Paul was in the hub of the great suffering and persecution taking place in the early church.  Christians were being beaten by mobs, synagogue leaders, and Roman authorities.  They faced imprisonment in jails that had no global humanitarian laws.  Many of these early Christians were impoverished, sometimes disowned by their own families.  Death was a daily possibility, either by a mob or the government itself.

When Paul writes,

But for your sake we are killed every day; we are being slaughtered like sheep.

What does he mean?

Like the people who wrote the original Psalm, early Christians were being faced with hardship that simply did not make sense to them.  Just like the early psalmists, many times they must have wondered if God cared for them at all.  He was allowing them to be brutalized, taunted, and killed.  Why wasn’t He standing up for them?

Just like the psalmists, they were obeying God’s covenant, but, unlike the psalmists, they had His new covenant, through Jesus Christ.  Just as the psalmist wondered why God would allow them to suffer when they were trying to follow His commandments, these new Christians were wondering why God would allow them to suffer when they were trying to follow Jesus.

It came down to a question: Was it worth suffering for the sake of God?

Some 1,000 years before God would come to suffer and die for the sake of His people, the psalmists answered with faith: yes.  It was worth it.

They end with great hope (v. 26):

Ransom us because of your unfailing love.

In the next verse of Romans, Paul will give these early Christians great hope, too, because he’s going to talk about the Ransom.

Romans 8:35

Can anything ever separate us from Christ’s love? Does it mean He no longer loves us if we have trouble or calamity, or are persecuted, or hungry, or destitute, or in danger, or threatened with death? (Romans 8:35, NLT)

February 28, 1944, a 52-year-old woman who lived a quiet life of watchmaking with her father and older sister would begin a shocking journey that would end in her ability to answer these two questions for thousands around the world.

Corrie Ten Boom, her family, and many of her friends were arrested on February 28, 1944.  It was World War II.  Hitler had overthrown her Holland government, and the Ten Boom family had stolen ration cards, hidden Jews, and coordinated their escapes to safer country homes when possible.

Corrie was sent to a political holding prison, then a prison camp built on Dutch ground, and finally to the Ravensbruck prison camp in Germany.  During her stay, she would witness and endure suffering unimaginable to outsiders.  Her father, sister Betsy, and nephew Kik died in prison camps, and her brother Willem died from a disease he’d contracted in the holding prison.

Corrie spent time in solitary confinement and hard labor, in illness and insult, starved and tormented, demeaned and disregarded.  All around her, prisoners were tortured and killed.  Yet in all this, Corrie and Betsy held their faith.  With Corrie’s smuggled Bible, they held church meetings in their barracks, and Betsy’s last words to Corrie were, “There is no pit so deep that God’s love is not deeper still.”

The words of Romans 8:35 are more than sentiment or comfort to Corrie.  These words represent the only hope she held onto through her months of imprisonment.

There was no pit that could separate Corrie from Christ’s love.

Today, all the trouble, calamity, persecution, hunger, destitution, and danger Corrie suffered have ended.  She has gone through death itself now, and nothing can threaten her any longer.

There are no more pits.

Only Christ’s love.

Can anything ever separate us from Christ’s love? Does it mean He no longer loves us if we have trouble or calamity, or are persecuted, or hungry, or destitute, or in danger, or threatened with death? (Romans 8:35, NLT)

Romans 8:34

Who then will condemn us? No one–for Christ Jesus died for us and was raised to life for us, and He is sitting in the place of honor at God’s right hand, pleading for us. (Romans 8:34, NLT)

I remember third grade music class like I lost nineteen years in a day.

Our music teacher seemed to be having a difficult time in her life.  (Back then, I didn’t have any pity for her, but now I do, because I’ve gone through difficult times myself.)  Our music teacher did not seem to me to like her job very much and she especially did not seem to me to like children.  She gave us musical worksheets to do as homework and bring back for a completion grade.  She had us sit and I don’t remember singing much except for our yearly production, or ever playing a musical instrument.  Instead, we were supposed to memorize music as it appears on paper (if music can truly appear on paper).

Our teacher was explaining something to us on this fateful day, and then she asked the infamous, “Does anyone have any questions?”

I raised my hand.  I did not like her.  And I did not understand.  And both of those truths showed through as I said, “I don’t understand.”  She pressed me for more, and I said, somewhat out of frustration, and, in all fairness, very sarcastically, “everything.”  I think kids laughed, I don’t remember.  But I do know what happened next.

I expected the Does anyone have any questions invitation meant she was going to answer my question.  Instead, she angrily told me to go sit at the boys’ table.

I was devastated.  I felt so incredibly condemned.  I always (tried) to follow teachers directions, and the only time I had gotten in any kind of trouble was in kindergarten when I’d playfully been pulling on a boy’s arm.  So I was completely crushed.  I turned into condemned slushee.

I dragged myself up, tears in my eyes, and I somehow got my body over to the boys’ table.  Girls never sat at the boys’ table.  I could not imagine how my question had caused such terrible punishment to take place.  I felt humiliated, scorned, and worthless.

I glanced over at the girls’ table, and the girls glanced at me and then quickly turned back to look at the teacher!  Traitors!  I sat low in my seat, judged and angry and, most of all, really, really, really super hurt.  I was so hurt that I would remember this event at night for months when I was trying to go to sleep and be tormented by it.

It couldn’t have been fifteen seconds into my mortification when I heard whistling.  Whistling.  WHISTLING!  As in, whistling in class!  Audible–however low and getting louder–noteworthy whistling.  There was no way the teacher missed it, or was there?  I don’t know.

I looked up, and I saw a boy grinning at me.  He winked.

And everything changed.

A few more boys in the circle lit up with winks and, I’m not really sure what kind-of calls they were, something like, “Hey, girl, girl” meant to be encouraging.  And sitting right across from me was this tall boy who whistled and didn’t care in the least who knew about it!

The rest of music time was very happy for me.  The boys winked and called to me.  The teacher either didn’t hear anything or pretended she didn’t hear anything.

Right before class ended, the teacher said (I am sure anticipating my immediate exit from her room), “Class is ending, but,” turning to me, “you will stay after class.”

I sunk again, but I didn’t realize.  Even as the boys left with their grins and calls and whistles, I didn’t realize.

The teacher had utterly lost her power to condemn me.

That tall boy, who left last, had found that power in music of a different tune.  Music he’d turned into a whistle.

She sat down across from me, and in a very quiet, pleasant voice she proceeded to explain the lesson to me.  I didn’t hear a word of it.  I wanted to get away from her as fast as I could.  When she asked me if I understood, I absolutely lied and said, “yes”, so I could get away from her.  I was very honest as a child, but I figured this lie wasn’t so bad because I would tell my mom about it when I got home.  (Now, of course, I disagree with myself about that.)

I went as fast as I could out of her room.  I was free!  I was free not just because she’d released me, but more so because one boy had chosen to forgive me and restore me back to good fellowship with not only the class, but the teacher as well.

As soon as I got to p.e. class, that tall boy came up to me and asked, “Are you ok?”

Yes, yes I was.

Thank you, Daniel.

Thank you for showing me a little about Jesus.

Who then will condemn us? No one–for Christ Jesus died for us and was raised to life for us, and He is sitting in the place of honor at God’s right hand, pleading for us. (Romans 8:34, NLT)

Romans 8:33

Who dares accuse us whom God has chosen for His own? No one–for God Himself has given us right standing with Himself. (Romans 8:33, NLT)

As a kid of the 80’s and early 90’s, I remember watching a movie on my parent’s box TV that typified the bizzarrity of pop culture of my generation.  The movie was about a man who had a potted plant.  He found out the plant talked.  The plant became his friend.  Then, one day, the plant got run over by a truck.

This anthropomorphized plant stayed in my mind.  For years.

One day, I went outside when my mom was weeding our flowerbeds.  As I watched her weed, I saw a weed that looked very similar to the potted plant in the movie.  I stared at that weed, and then back at my mom, who was tossing weeds left and right.  I knew this weed’s time was almost up.  And somehow, someway, I bonded to that weed.

I immediately informed my mother of my friendship with the weed.  My mom, fully familiar with my frequent irrationality (but in my defense, look at the era I grew up in), agreed not to pull the weed.

I was happy . . . but only for a few moments.  I began to wonder what might happen to my weed while I was away.  Would someone else kill my weed?

My mom had a funny little garden ornament that said I don’t remember planting this.  I got it and stuck it in the ground beside my weed.  There.  Now it was safe.

Happily, my weed did not get run over by a truck.

When we believe in Jesus as our Savior, God Himself comes and puts a sign beside us that says Do not uproot.  It doesn’t matter how much of a weed we are—God cares about us, and He loves us because we have been rescued by His Son.  Who is going to point out that we’re a weed when we’re in His garden?

And what’s more, God has the power to change us into flowers.  And, by His Son’s sacrifice for us, He does.

Who dares accuse us whom God has chosen for His own? No one–for God Himself has given us right standing with Himself. (Romans 8:33, NLT)

Romans 8:32

Since [God] did not spare even His own Son but gave Him up for us all, won’t He also give us everything else? (Romans 8:32, NLT)

What else is there?

Once we have the Son, what else is there?

There was a time when I thought coming to Jesus for salvation was the strategy to get the victory, the map to get to the treasure, the gate to get to Heaven.  It wasn’t until events in my life took me to a very dark and very scary place that I realized Jesus isn’t only our escape route.  He’s our Way for life!  Jesus is the victory.  Jesus is the treasure.  Jesus is Heaven.

We have God’s greatest assurance of His love: if He has given us His immeasurably precious Son, and we receive Him, how can we fear He will withhold anything good from us?

We also have God’s greatest assurance of His wrath: if He has given us His immeasurably precious Son, and we reject Him, how can we not fear He will withhold everything good from us?

Since [God] did not spare even His own Son but gave Him up for us all, won’t He also give us everything else? (Romans 8:32, NLT)

Romans 8:31

What shall we say about such wonderful things as these? If God is for us, who can ever be against us? (Romans 8:31, NLT)

In Romans 8:28-30, we learn about the “wonderful things as these”.

And we know that God causes everything to work together for the good of those who love God and are called according to His purpose for them.  For God knew His people in advance, and He chose them to become like His Son, so that His Son would be the firstborn among many brothers and sisters. And having chosen them, He called them to come to Him.  And having called them, He gave them right standing with Himself.  And having given them right standing, He gave them His glory. (Romans 8:28-30, NLT, 30 underlined)

This is wonderful.

This is WONDERFUL!

This is WONDERFUL!!!

How can it be that I can be such a bedraggled, defective, junk-burdened person, and yet God would want to give me such “wonderful things as these”?

And since this is true . . . “If God is for us, who can ever be against us?”

Have you ever played one of those match-up games where you try to figure out who will win out against who?  Like, will Jigglypuff win or will Donkey Kong win?  Will a tyrannosaurus rex win or will a Samurai win?

Well, any match up against God . . . is no match up at all.  No one is a match for God.  No one can trick Him.  No one can bully Him.  And no one can ever, ever win against Him.

What shall we say about such wonderful things as these? If God is for us, who can ever be against us? (Romans 8:31, NLT)

Published in: on May 17, 2011 at 10:39 pm  Leave a Comment  
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Romans 8:30

And having chosen them, He called them to come to Him.  And having called them, He gave them right standing with Himself.  And having given them right standing, He gave them His glory. (Romans 8:30, NLT)

In context:

And we know that God causes everything to work together for the good of those who love God and are called according to His purpose for them.  For God knew His people in advance, and He chose them to become like His Son, so that His Son would be the firstborn among many brothers and sisters.  And having chosen them, He called them to come to Him.  And having called them, He gave them right standing with Himself.  And having given them right standing, He gave them His glory. (Romans 8:28-30, NLT, 30 underlined)

There is a sequence of events:

  1. God causes everything to work together for the good of those who love God and are called according to His purpose for them. (v. 28)
  2. God knew His people in advance. (v. 29)
  3. He chose them to become like His Son.  (v. 29)
  4. He called them to come to Him. (v. 30)
  5. He gave them right standing with Himself.  (v. 30)
  6. He gave them His glory.  (v. 30)

2-6 explain how 1 is possible.

God causes everything to work together for the good of those who love God and are called according to His purpose for them. (v. 28)

How could He make sure everything worked for their good?

God knew His people in advance.  (v. 29)

Since God knew who would choose Him before He had even created the world, He could already plan so that all the bad that would happen because of sin could be worked out for good in their lives.

How did He work out His plan?

He chose them to become like His Son. (v. 29)

Merely having a willingness to believe in God does not guarantee an acceptance.  In fact, believing in God cannot get you closer to Him if there is no way to Him!  When Adam sinned, it was like boulders fell on the path that led to God, and all of humanity was blocked off from ever worshiping in His presence again.  No matter how bad Adam—or any other human—might want to believe in God, the way was obstructed by sin.

God could have looked out from His throne and done absolutely nothing to help the people who would want to choose Him if they knew such a way was possible.  After all, they had betrayed Him not only through their initial choice to turn away, but in every choice after.  These people didn’t know there was a way back to God—not without His divine intervention and revelation—and so no one was choosing God.  Everyone was doing evil.

But God did intervene and reveal.  Throughout the Old Testament, we have stories of God’s intervention and revelations.  He talked to Adam and Eve after the fall, and He revealed that salvation would one day come—through their very line.  He continued to reveal sacred and precious hints of His masterplan through His interventions with people like Abraham, Jacob, Moses, Joseph, Samuel, David, Daniel, and Esther.

He called them to come to Him. (v. 30)

God knew and knows who will come to Him and who will never make that choice—but we don’t!  We live inside of time, and we live in a very particular part of time: the present.  The past and future are inaccessible to us.  The past can be recalled; the future is entirely unknown, unless God intervenes.

This is the perfect setting for God’s plan.

Why?

The past is inaccessible.  This means Christ’s sacrifice can never be undone.

The past can be recalled.  This allows for eye witness accounts of Christ’s sacrifice and historical evidence of His death and resurrection.  Most vitally, this allows for the Bible to be written and past events to be recounted.

The future is entirely unknown, unless God intervenes.  One of the ways God showed Himself as God from the very beginning of life after the fall was to reveal hints of the future.  The first prophesy was given to Eve, that one day a child would be given to her line that would destroy the evil snake that had tricked Eve and ruined her relationship with God.

Prophets in the Old Testament proved themselves as real by foretelling events that would happen: sometimes soon, and sometimes far out into future.  The book of Revelation gives Christians assurance that we will be eternally protected by God and that God has the most brilliant, beautiful, righteous, merciful plan of all time to end the current suffering of the world and give His people eternal life with Him.

We live in the present.  We live in the present and so, as long as we are breathing, there is hope that we will come to God.  While God knows who will come to Him and who will reject Him for all eternity, we only know the choice we have made in past and the choice we commit to in the present.  Confining us to live in the present is God’s masterful and merciful way of giving us every opportunity to choose Him before we die.  If we lived in the past, we would be fated as who we are.  If we lived in the future, we would be suffering the consequences of our sin.  Only in the present can we make the choice to believe in Jesus Christ.   

He gave them right standing with Himself.  (v. 30)

God knew there was no way back to Him unless He offered Himself as atonement for the sins of the world.  It was meaningless as to whether people would want to go back to Him or not if there was no way back.

In Jesus’ beautiful parable of the prodigal son, it is only possible for the son to go home if the father is willing to take him back in.  Jesus told this parable in Jerusalem  Only Jesus, as He tells the story, understands the sacrifice the father must make to bring his prodigal back.  Only Jesus knew He was soon going to die on the cross to make that way possible[1].

He gave them His glory.  (v. 30)

The culmination of these three verses is enough to short-circuit your brain.  Here is God, creating a people He knows will fail Him because He loves them so much . . . working out a plan to save them so they can make the choice to come back to Him . . . revealing that plan is the greatest tragedy and suffering of all time, not just in human history, but in the history of all, this suffering brought upon the perfect Son of God, Jesus Christ . . . and that Jesus Christ brings those people He died for not only back as happy servants—although He certainly could have!—but as His own brothers and sisters, bringing them into His very own perfect and totally complete family.  There is no reason ever for Jesus to do this unless it is by a supernatural love, grace, and mercy beyond our wildest understanding.

And we know that God causes everything to work together for the good of those who love God and are called according to His purpose for them.  For God knew His people in advance, and He chose them to become like His Son, so that His Son would be the firstborn among many brothers and sisters. And having chosen them, He called them to come to Him.  And having called them, He gave them right standing with Himself.  And having given them right standing, He gave them His glory. (Romans 8:28-30, NLT, 30 underlined)


[1] John MacArthur has a wonderful little book on the parable of the prodigal son called Grace For You: A Compelling story of God’s Redemption.

Published in: on May 15, 2011 at 3:03 pm  Leave a Comment  
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