The number one challenge

“That’s the number one challenge: getting over the idea that there’s nothing we can do.”

–Gary Haugen, CEO and President of International Justice Mission (IJM), from DVD Not For Sale on sex trafficking

I don’t ever again want to hear myself think, on any topic of injustice or poverty or ignorance, that there is nothing I can do.

God did not make porcelain dolls.  He made His believers new creations to go out into the world and reach the lost for Christ. There is no darkness that can stand in His way.  We carry His light not only for our own sight, but for the illumination of all around us.

Who will go up against sex trafficking, slavery, abortion, starvation, persecution, domestic abuse, epidemics, homelessness, illiteracy, gangs, corruption?

Jesus!

The question is, Who is going with Him?

I raise my hand and cry out, Me!  Me, Lord!  I will go with You!

“You are the light of the world. A city located on a hill can’t be hidden. People don’t light a lamp and put it under a basket but on a lamp stand, and it gives light to everyone in the house. In the same way, let your light shine before people in such a way that they will see your good works and glorify your Father in heaven.” (Matthew 5:14-16, ISV)

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Priority

Puppies are cute.  But children last forever.

I see.

No longer do I pour my money into doggy daycare, pompom cuts, high-end dog food, or buying hundreds-of-dollars dogs.  In fact, no longer do I have a dog, not because it’s wrong to have a dog, but because my money was in the exaltation of the puppy above the care of the child.

Ever since I committed my life to Christ, I have seen that my priorities . . were not God’s.  God cares more about the malnourished child in India, the sick child in Thailand, the uneducated child in Nicaragua, the child who wants after-school tutoring in Brazil, the child who wants to stay away from gangs in Kenya, the child who needs water in Tanzania, the child who has never had a celebrated birthday in Bangladesh, the child who needs a medical check-up in Peru, the child who wants to play sports in Guatemala, the orphaned child in Rwanda, the lonely child in America . . than He cares about puppies.

Children have souls.

He [Jesus] sat down, called the twelve disciples over to him, and said, “Whoever wants to be first must take last place and be the servant of everyone else.”

Then he put a little child among them. Taking the child in his arms, he said to them, “Anyone who welcomes a little child like this on my behalf welcomes me, and anyone who welcomes me welcomes not only me but also my Father who sent me.” (Mark 9:36-37, NLT)

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Photograph by Bordecia, profile on http://www.flickr.com/people/habesha/

Photograph is under Creative Commons License.

See Copyright Page for Bible translation information.

My house

Muhoza lives in Rwanda. She is 5 years old. In the community she lives, the average family income is $15.

My house is made of brick.  My house has a shingled roof.  My house has wood floors.

Muhoza’s house is made of poles.  Her house has a roof of iron sheets.  Her house has a cow dung floor.

Poverty matters.

If someone has enough money to live well and sees a brother or sister in need but shows no compassion–how can God’s love be in that person? (1 John 3:17, NIV)

Help a child today.

Link to sponsor a child from Rwanda.

Give a one-time gift for children in poverty.

Published in: on April 14, 2012 at 12:15 pm  Leave a Comment  
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$5

$5 won’t get you into a movie most places.  It won’t get you a meal at a restaurant.  It might get you an iced tea.

$5 won’t get you much at the grocery store–milk and cookies, maybe, if you get the cheap kind.

$5 won’t get you much, not usually.  Maybe if you’re thrifty, and you cut coupons or search flea markets and garage sales, you can get something good for $5.  But in most cases, $5 just doesn’t buy much.

But imagine this, with me, if you will.  Imagine that you live on $5 a month.

About 17 cents a day.

But that’s not what’s happening to the poorest of the poor in Rwanda.

That’s what’s happening to the poorest who are finding jobs.

Others make nothing.

How–how can a person support himself or herself and children on 17 cents a day?

And how, if a person’s spouse, or child, is sick with AIDS . . how would they get medical help with 17 cents a day?

Can I even pretend I can imagine this lifestyle?

No, I can’t.

But this is reality for children like Divine.

Divine lives with her mother and two siblings in a community of 70,000 where the average income is $5.00 for those who find work.  As much as I can’t imagine her life . . . there is something I can begin to imagine.

What it would be like for her to find out she has a sponsor.

For those who believe in Jesus Christ, there is no reason we should throw our hands in the air when we think about global poverty.

We can help out, whatever we can give, one family, one child at a time, in the name of Jesus Christ.

On behalf of all the Divine’s in the world, I beg all Christians everywhere to help.

What good is it, dear brothers and sisters, if you say you have faith but don’t show it by your actions? Can that kind of faith save anyone? Suppose you see a brother or sister who has no food or clothing, and you say, “Good-bye and have a good day; stay warm and eat well”—but then you don’t give that person any food or clothing. What good does that do? (James 2:14-16, NLT)

Help a child today.

Link to sponsor a child from Rwanda.

Give a one-time gift for children in poverty.

What would you buy with your birthday money?

I might buy an iTunes giftcard.  Or scarves.  Or more science and documentary movies.  Or a neck pillow.  Or something cute from Etsy.  Or jellybeans.

I wouldn’t by a vase for rice.  That wouldn’t even cross my mind.  I don’t like rice that much.  I have a pantry and fridge of stuff I do like–plenty of it.  Meat, cheese, bread, cheese, cereal, cheese, veggies, cheese, fruit . . and I think I have some cheese, too.

For me, birthday money is about what I want, not about what my family needs to survive.  I don’t have to worry about bugs or moisture getting into my food.  I think life is bad when my back hurts or I have to get the oil filters in my car replaced.  I would be dejected if I had to spend my birthday money on some kind of necessity.

But for one 11-year-old girl in India, dejected wasn’t at all the tone of her thank-you letter to me for birthday money.  She explained how my little gift had bought her family a container to hold their rice so it wouldn’t spoil.  She sent “heartfelt thanks” and “loving thanks and love once again” and just to make sure she got the point across, closed “with loving thanks”.

It makes me wonder . . how much the world would change . . if everyone spent their money as selflessly as this 11-year-old girl in India.

What good is it, dear brothers and sisters, if you say you have faith but don’t show it by your actions? Can that kind of faith save anyone? Suppose you see a brother or sister who has no food or clothing, and you say, “Good-bye and have a good day; stay warm and eat well”—but then you don’t give that person any food or clothing. What good does that do? (James 2:14-16, NLT)

If God is stirring your heart to help a child, you can sponsor a child and share the love of Jesus Christ through Compassion International today.

Click here to sponsor a child from India.

Or here to sponsor a child from anywhere in the world.

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Photograph by McKay Savage, profile on http://www.flickr.com/photos/mckaysavage/

Photograph is under Creative Commons License.